Skip to main content

Album Review: Neither Fish Nor Flesh

It's been a while since I did an album review (or any review, to be honest) so the time has come. The album will be Terence Trent D'Arby's 1989 sophomore effort, Neither Fish Nor Flesh, a Soundtrack of Love, Faith, Hope & Destruction.

I know what you're thinking: why is Mark reviewing a thirty year old album that was considered a failure, even by D'Arby himself? The answer is simple: I enjoy listening to it. I'll go so far as to say I love the album in all its sprawling glory.

In 1987, D'Arby made his infamous debut with "Introducing The Hardline According To Terence Trent D'Arby," with the claim that "my album is better than Sgt. Pepper." This, in the twentieth anniversary of said Beatles album, caused a huge controversy, as one might imagine. And he was right; I enjoy Introducing The Hardline... more than Sgt. Pepper while remaining a fan of both bands.

All this attention caused great expectations for a follow up, but Neither Fish Nor Flesh was met with a lukewarm reception upon release. An album of solid songs but no stand out singles, it spent a short time on the charts before fading from the public eye.

I recall seeing D'Arby on television in what seemed to be a sidewalk interview in which he apologized for the album's performance. I couldn't believe what I was seeing, as NFNF (as I'll call it) was, to my taste, far superior to its predecessor.

Clearly, I was in the minority. Perhaps it was a personal thing, the right album at the right time for a struggling young artist wannabe. Perhaps I heard something others didn't.

If you haven't heard it, give it a listen on your preferred streaming service. Neither Fish Nor Flesh will impress 30 years on.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The World In Which We Live: Pandemic Edition

What a year 2020 has become. As the federal government (particularly the head of the executive branch) dithered, a microscopic killer grew in strength and swept across the globe. A novel virus; one which humans have not been exposed to and thus have no immunity from. No effective treatment, no vaccine at this time. The possibilities are horrendous. At first it was a China problem, then an Asia problem, before it became a global problem. In my home state of Georgia, it has become a human behavior problem. The state has been partially shut down for a matter less than one month, yet is set to reopen in days. Never mind that our governor claimed he was unaware that the virus could spread via asymptomatic persons, earning himself a place on the Dumbest Governors list. The state is reopening with a mind-boggling list of businesses: hair salons, barber shops, tattoo parlors, massage parlors, bars. These are the last  businesses that should open, yet Kemp, doing his best impression of a son

April Fool's Day, Distance Edition

Ah, April Fool's Day, the day in which a middle aged man such as myself gets to clown around at the expense of friends, family and colleagues. Not this year. The world is on edge and there is palpable tension in the air. Everyone is feeling anxiety, about the COVID-19 pandemic, the economic crash, shortages, physical distancing and more. Speaking for myself, it doesn't help that the Empire State Building is lit up like an emergency vehicle: This year, I'll go home to my family. Instead of pulling a prank, I'll ask how the day went. My son has piano class (over FaceTime for the foreseeable future) on Wednesdays, so I expect to hear a song or two. Dinner, a little TV, then end the day. 2020, you win. But I'll be back. We'll be back, We always come back.

The World In Which We Live: Premature Reopening Edition

I don't even know where to begin. Despite there being no effective treatment, vaccination, or the much-discussed herd immunity, many states are relaxing social restrictions put in place to mitigate the spread of Covid-19. My home state of Georgia was among the first to do so (my sense of timing and location is impeccable). Instead of a state economy charging out of the gates like a racehorse, we get this: An 83% increase of confirmed cases in my county, which is mostly rural with a small industrial base, 90 miles from Atlanta. But freedom, amiright? I find it utterly amazing that people find being instructed to stay in their homes and take extra precautions to prevent becoming infected with a fatal disease a form of tyranny. When did "Wear a mask and wash your hands regularly" become equal to tanks in the streets? I understand wanting a haircut; Hell, I need  one but don't want to kill my barber, a nice guy who fits nicely into the at-risk category. Do