Skip to main content

Economic Insights From "Gone With The Wind"


My wife and I recently enjoyed seeing Gone With The Wind projected on a movie screen, a first for us both. We'd seen it on television, but the large screen experience was something quite different. A good many years had passed since I last watched the film, and I was struck by its comedic moments, as well as its more blatant racism and misogyny (times have changed and continue to!)
I was also impressed with its rather solid financial advice. For example, when raising funds for "the Cause" (AKA war), Rhett Butler made an impression on the crowd with an offer of gold for a dance. In times of political turmoil, you know, civil war, regime change and such, precious metals are more desirable than paper money issued by a government that may or may not be in power in days to come. This point is hammered home in a later scene, when Scarlett O'Hara returns home to find the family estate in ruins and her father in shock. He tells her not to worry, as he has money. At first, Scarlett is relieved, but when told the money is in Confederate war bonds, she realizes the family is broke - the government that issued those bonds has fallen and they are worthless. Mr. O'Hara still has a head for permanence, however; he reminds Scarlett that land is a great asset, "it's the only thing that lasts!"
In summary, we're reminded that precious metal bullion is a great hedge in times of turmoil, paper (or digital, as times have changed) currency is backed only by faith and credit in the issuing body and is subject to the fate of said body, and land indeed is the only thing that lasts. I left the theater thinking I need to buy bullion and acreage!
In closing, it was a great night put on at the beautiful GEM Theatre in Calhoun, Georgia, just an hour or so north of the film's setting.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Quote Of The Day, Bush Edition

“Fear cannot be banished, but it can be calm and without panic, it can be mitigated by reason and evaluation.” Vannevar Bush

In Memorium: Shaun Mullen, A Most Generous Man

Author, editor, blogger, and so much more Shaun Mullen has passed. Noting his blog Kiko's House hadn't been updated in a while, I did a search and discovered his obituary.

My friendship with Shaun goes back to 2006. While living in Australia, I'd discovered his blog when searching for informed commentary on US foreign policy in the Middle East. Sadly, much of that policy remains unchanged 14 years later, but that is for another post. Shaun  had noticed that his blog wasn't rendering correctly in Internet Explorer and asked if anyone could suggest a fix. I, being a bit of a tech head at the time, suggested Firefox or similar browser, and the problem was solved.

We kept in and out of touch, finding common ground in music (I mentioned my love for the Grateful Dead and Shaun sent a dozen CDs of concert recordings. By International mail. The man was generous to a fault.), worldview, and more. My old site got its greatest number of hits when Shaun linked to a few of my photo…

April Fool's Day, Distance Edition

Ah, April Fool's Day, the day in which a middle aged man such as myself gets to clown around at the expense of friends, family and colleagues.

Not this year. The world is on edge and there is palpable tension in the air. Everyone is feeling anxiety, about the COVID-19 pandemic, the economic crash, shortages, physical distancing and more. Speaking for myself, it doesn't help that the Empire State Building is lit up like an emergency vehicle:
This year, I'll go home to my family. Instead of pulling a prank, I'll ask how the day went. My son has piano class (over FaceTime for the foreseeable future) on Wednesdays, so I expect to hear a song or two. Dinner, a little TV, then end the day.

2020, you win. But I'll be back. We'll be back, We always come back.